Royal Cartouche adjustable Silver Ring
Royal Cartouche adjustable Silver Ring
Royal Cartouche adjustable Silver Ring
Royal Cartouche adjustable Silver Ring
Royal Cartouche adjustable Silver Ring
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  • Load image into Gallery viewer, Royal Cartouche adjustable Silver Ring
  • Load image into Gallery viewer, Royal Cartouche adjustable Silver Ring
  • Load image into Gallery viewer, Royal Cartouche adjustable Silver Ring
  • Load image into Gallery viewer, Royal Cartouche adjustable Silver Ring

Royal Cartouche adjustable Silver Ring

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$45.00 USD
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$45.00 USD
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The Royal Cartouche Adjustable Silver Ring combines ancient Egyptian elegance with modern versatility. Inspired by the symbolic cartouche, which contained the pharaoh's name, this ring pays homage to a rich history of royal adornment while offering adjustable sizing for contemporary comfort and style.

  • History: Inspired by ancient Egyptian royal cartouches used to encircle the names of pharaohs.
  • Spiritually: Carries the essence of ancient Egyptian symbolism, representing power and protection.
  • Talisman: A potent symbol of authority and connection to ancient wisdom.
  • Handmade: Crafted with care and precision, each ring is a unique piece of art.
  • Healing: Thought to channel the energy of silver, known for its cleansing and protective properties.
  • Material: Sterling silver, a metal long associated with purity and mysticism.
  • Symbolism: Depicts the sacred cartouche, symbolizing eternity and divine protection.
  • How to Wear: Adjustable design ensures a perfect fit for any finger, worn with reverence for its spiritual significance.
  • Royal Cartouche Adjustable Silver Ring: A timeless piece, embodying the majesty and mystique of ancient Egypt.

History Side For Those Who Are Interested

The Egyptian Royal Cartouche holds a significant place in the annals of ancient Egyptian history, representing a distinctive emblem of pharaonic authority and divine connection. Its origins can be traced back to the early dynastic period, around the 31st century BCE, during the reign of King Narmer, also known as Menes, who is credited with the unification of Upper and Lower Egypt. 

Initially serving as a symbolic enclosure for the pharaoh's name, the cartouche evolved over millennia, assuming a central role in the iconography and ideological landscape of ancient Egypt. Its primary function was to encapsulate the royal titulary, comprising the pharaoh's birth name (nomen) and Horus name (praenomen), which often included references to divine patronage and cosmic authority.

The elongated oval shape of the cartouche, resembling a rope tied at one end, was imbued with profound symbolism, reflecting notions of eternity and protection. This motif was inspired by the hieroglyphic depiction of a knotted rope, known as "shen," symbolizing eternal protection and cyclical renewal.

Throughout Egypt's dynastic history, the cartouche became an integral feature of monumental architecture, temple inscriptions, royal seals, and a myriad of other artifacts, underscoring the pharaoh's omnipotence and divine mandate. Its presence signified the pharaoh's dominion over the cosmos and his role as the intermediary between the mortal realm and the divine sphere.

The significance of the cartouche extended beyond royal contexts, permeating Egyptian society and culture. Commoners often adorned themselves with amulets bearing miniature cartouches, believed to confer protection and divine favor upon the wearer.

During the New Kingdom period (16th–11th centuries BCE), the cartouche reached its zenith of prominence, particularly under the reign of illustrious pharaohs such as Amenhotep III, Tutankhamun, and Ramesses II. Monumental constructions, such as the temples of Karnak and Luxor, bore inscriptions adorned with elaborate cartouches, commemorating the pharaoh's grandeur and immortal legacy.

With the decline of pharaonic authority following the conquest of Egypt by Alexander the Great in 332 BCE and the subsequent advent of Greco-Roman rule, the use of the cartouche gradually waned, eventually fading into obscurity with the demise of ancient Egyptian civilization.

Despite its antiquity, the legacy of the Egyptian Royal Cartouche endures as a testament to the enduring power and mystique of ancient Egypt, captivating the imagination of scholars, archaeologists, and enthusiasts alike, and serving as a poignant reminder of humanity's enduring fascination with the enigmatic allure of the Nile Valley's majestic past.